Lend a support to enable smallholder farmers in rural Ghana access IT & financial services

Farmerline recently launched a 30-day Kiva campaign to raise a $100,000 loan to connect 6,000 smallholder farmers in Ghana to financial services, market information, weather forecasts and quality inputs. We need your help to reach our goal today July 18 in a few hours!

In 2016, we launched our first campaign with Kiva and were able to raise $50,000 to connect 1,000 smallholder farmers to high quality and affordable farm inputs at 20 – 30% below market price. We want to extend our reach!

As a supporter and friend of Farmerline, your contribution would go a long way! As little as $25 would ensure a supply of farmer inputs for a month at a 1 – 2 acre farm, while a $75 loan would ensure a rice or vegetable farmer has input supply for four months and is able to focus on ensuring consistent quality yield.

To learn more about our Kiva campaign and become a lender, visit Farmerline Kiva campaign.

Click the video below to hear from a few of the farmers we serve!

 

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Lend a support to enable smallholder farmers in rural Ghana access IT & financial services
was published on 18.07.2018 by Worlali Senyo. It files under global, sub saharan africa
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Mobile storytelling and shared village displays

Last week our students had to present a conference paper as part of their HCI class activities. The slides below are based on the paper “Mobile Digital Storytelling in a Developmental Context” by David Frohlich et al., which was presented at CHI this year.

The paper describes a field study that was conducted in an Indian village, where people received mobile camera phones to record non-textual stories, which were also presented on a village display.

Study participants rated the stories they created regarding their motivation, which was distributed between relevance for the community and personal interest. They further stated that most of the stories were created to be viewed by friends and family. Many of the stories were shown on the village display and often large groups of 15-20 people gathered around the 17″ monitor to watch stories.

In their study, which was organised in collaboration with local NGOs they discovered two different types of content and uses for custom mobile storytelling. On the one hand it can be used to help local organisations in creating and sharing information more easily, involving local people in the process. On the other hand they suggest that mass mobile storytelling applications could be deployed on a larger scale to create local cultural libraries. These libraries could complement conventional books, being represented as spoken word and video, instead of written text. Their vision is that stories could be checked out from the distance and played on mobile or public displays.

What I found most interesting when reading the paper was the high use of the public village display. This really shows the potential of such displays for shared communication in developing contexts. I doubt that similar uses of public displays would be emerge in the western world.

The complete paper is available from the ACM library.

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Mobile storytelling and shared village displays
was published on 21.05.2009 by Martin Tomitsch. It files under south asia
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MobileActive08: Francis Mijiga

In the interview below Francis Mijiga shares his perspective on the potentials of mobile phones for rural areas in Africa. He explains how government regulations have contributed to the penetration of mobile phones into rural areas. In his opinion mobile access to information will help to improve the economy and social issues in those areas. Francis Mijiga works as a communication technology consultant for TCCL in Malawi.

This is the 8th interview from our MobileActive08 video podcast series, shot at the conference in Johannesburg (organized by MobileActive and sangonet).

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MobileActive08: Francis Mijiga
was published on 02.01.2009 by Martin Tomitsch. It files under sub saharan africa
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Mobile phones in rural areas of Zanzibar

I’m back to Vienna and left my colleagues Martin and Anders behind in Zanzibar, where they’re doing more interviews with people in and around Jambiani to cover the use of mobile phones in rural areas.

In towns almost everybody owns a mobile phone. This is still different in rural areas. Local people working at resorts usually have a mobile phone, since they need it for their work. Some of the people we spoke to also told us that they receive airtime from their employers. A quite impressive experience was to see Masaai performing traditional dances, still wearing their traditional dresses and living according to their cultural customs, but at the same time being on the mobile phone all the time.

Mobile phones had a huge impact in rural areas, since it is relatively easy to set up a network antenna. In contrast, Internet is still hard to find in those areas. That’s also why Martin and Anders aren’t able to post any news at the moment. They’ll report from their experiences once they’re back to Stone Town.

Antennas at the beach of Jambiani

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Mobile phones in rural areas of Zanzibar
was published on 27.10.2008 by Martin Tomitsch. It files under east asia
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