mayworld – video blog

May van Gent is an independent video journalist who initially put us in touch with the Zanzibits project – of which our web development school project Zanzicode developed.

She is also currently on Zanzibar, shooting at Sauti za Busara (Sounds of Wisdom) East African music festival and creating a short movie of Zanzicode.

On her blog mayworld she frequently publishes videos of her travels, right now:

You can follow the first steps in my life as a video journalist.

The journey starts in Tanzania, East Africa.
Where the road will take me I don’t know yet.

I just arrived in Zanzibar. After Sauti za Busara (Sounds of Wisdom) an international festival celebrating East African music from 11-16 February I will continue the trip. Probably I’ll go from Malawi to Mozambique to be in South Africa for the world cup 2010 .

You can see video’s on different events, people, days, party’s, mornings etc etc. [from May’s blog mayworld]

She also has a Flickr account, so if you want to get some impressions on East Africa – and especially of the amazing music festival which just took place in Zanzibar, check her out.

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mayworld – video blog
was published on 02.03.2010 by Florian Sturm. It files under east asia, sub saharan africa
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AfriGadget

Just a quick point to athe great blog AfriGadget which deals with innovation and creativity in Africa.

AfriGadget is a website dedicated to showcasing African ingenuity. A team of bloggers and readers contribute their pictures, videos and stories from around the continent. The stories of innovation are inspiring. It is a testament to Africans bending the little they have to their will, using creativity to overcome life’s challenges. [snippet from here]

The examples are simply stunning, reaching from farming innovations to camel-milk cooling devices, often combining high tech, low tech and garbage to create useful and simple machines.

The founder of AfriGadget is the same guy who stands behind UshahidiErik Hersman. Here is a small slideshow-presentation of AfriGadget on The World.

Check out the site

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AfriGadget
was published on 08.09.2008 by Florian Sturm. It files under global
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Blogroll for the South Ossetia conflict

I closely followed the conflict between Georgia and Russia in the last days.

It has extensive coverage in the blogsphere, so I want to provide some interesting blogs with different points of views for everyone to form his own opinion.

  • The Oil and the Glory – author Steve LeVine covers foreign affairs and energy for BusinessWeek
  • Registan.net – covers issues of post-soviet countries since 2003
  • Global Voices Online – great platform which offers news from places not so covered by mass media with background information and input from various sources

I also want to point to this article of Mark Almond a friend of mine sent me the link and to this one of Yulia Latynina.

For me personally it is/was quite hard to form an own opinion of that whole thing as – like every war – it is quite complex; but from the ICT4D point of view it is fascinating that so many people take the opportunity to express their views and contribute through blogs and even the mass media draws information from them.

Participative journalism, here we go again.

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Blogroll for the South Ossetia conflict
was published on 12.08.2008 by Florian Sturm. It files under global
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Blogging in Central Asia

As I have a special interest in the region of Central Asia and Eastern Europe, I was pleased to read of a BarCamp in Georgia in June where over hundred of bloggers from that region met.

Blogging is in some states even the only possibility besides the state-controlled media for people to get news. One example:

In Armenia, where a post-election state of emergency limited the media to publishing only official government news for 20 days after the March 1 clashes, blogs moved in to fill the gap. (…) “Blogs were the only alternative to the mass media, especially as independent and pro-opposition online media sites were blocked or censored. Blogs registered phenomenal numbers in terms of readers.” – as Artur Papyan, Armenia Country Director for the Media Diversity Institute puts it in [this article]

There exists a flourishing scene of bloggers in these countries – the article talks about 3000 in Armenia, 8000 in Azerbaijan and 10-15 000 in Georgia – which was definitely new to me.

As in many of the post-Sowjet countries there are still dictatorships or other repressive regimes, it’s substantial that internet finally gives the possibility to publically express own opinions and views.

In that context initiatives like Global Voices Online who point a spotlight at these regions and offer guides how to start blogging and especially how to stay anonymous during blogging when free speech is unwanted are highly valuable.

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Blogging in Central Asia
was published on 06.08.2008 by Florian Sturm. It files under global
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