TEQtogether teams up with ICT4D.at

TEQtogether is committed to changing men’s attitudes and behaviours towards women and technology.

Digital Technologies can bring great benefits to individuals and communities. However, they also have a darker side, increasing inequalities and being widely used for abuse and harassment. This is especially true at the interface between women and technology. Women are not only often marginalised in the tech sector, but they are also frequently violated through technology. TEQtogether fights to change men’s attitudes and behaviours towards gender equality and women’s rights in the technology sector.

We are proud to partner up with TEQtogether. ICT4D.at will fight with them for an equal world and women rights in the technology sector. We will contribute with our experience and expertise from the ICT field, create awareness for this essential issue and carry our shared vision in every project we implement. Paul is an official member of the team lead by Elizabeth Quaglia and Tim Unwin.

As a start, we contributed in the creation of a Guidance Note: Convening a computer programming workshop. Women and girls need to be able to receive appropriate and relevant training in computer programming at all levels, or they will miss out on numerous employment opportunities across the technology sector. You can find our contribution and all of the other TEQTogether’s Guidance notes here.

Six things to do if you are convening a computer programming workshop

  1. As far as possible ensure an equal balance between men and women as invited trainers and speakers.
  2. If it is intended to be a mixed gender workshop, seek to ensure an equal balance between women and men as participants.
  3. Ensure equal access for women and men to all shared material and equipment, before, during and after the workshop.
  4. Ensure that all sub-groups within the workshop have mixed genders within them and every member has equal rights to speak up and participate.
  5. Ensure that there are guidelines on expected behaviour that specifically address sexual harassment.
  6. Be pro-active if you see inappropriate behaviour.

Six things to avoid if you are convening a computer programming workshop

  1. Permitting or condoning inappropriate sexual behaviour by participants, trainers, speakers, or sponsors during the workshop.
  2. Only inviting men to be speakers or trainers.
  3. Only choosing men to participate in the workshop if it is intended to be open to all genders.
  4. Only granting male participants access to shared materials and equipment during the workshop.
  5. Separating men and women into two groups with unequal access to resources during the workshop.
  6. Doing nothing if you see inappropriate behaviour.

You can download the PDF Version from here.


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TEQtogether teams up with ICT4D.at
was published on 25.02.2019 by Paul Spiesberger. It files under global
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MobileActive08: Kutoma Wakunuma

This is the second of the interviews we shot the MobileActive08 conference in Johannesburg last month (organized by MobileActive.org and sangonet). In this video Dr Kutoma Wakunuma from Sheffield Hallam University (UK) talks about the social and economic impacts of new technologies in developing countries. She is specifically interested in gender aspects and investigates how mobile phones and the Internet can empower women in countries like Zambia. In the interview she discusses results from a study that she conducted in Zambia four years ago, regarding differences of mobile phone use between men and women. Her conclusion is that there is a need for more research focusing on the downsides (like social conflicts) of new technologies in developing countries.





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MobileActive08: Kutoma Wakunuma
was published on 07.11.2008 by Martin Tomitsch. It files under sub saharan africa
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How Weblogs help Women in Bangladesh to create new Skills

The Nari Jibon project is a training program in Dhaka, Bangladesh, which started in 2005. It provides short term training programs for the poor and under-privileged women in the area. The women attending the program are taught English, but the program especially aims to educate them in computer skills. This includes computer office programs, computer repair, graphics & web design, ICT, and photography.

The goal of the project is to help poor women develop new skills, which would allow them to earn some money for their livelihood and make them more self-reliant.

Last year the project received a grant from Global/Rising Voices for the incorporation of weblogs in their training programs. Using weblogs within classes gives the Bangladeshi women a voice and allows them to enhance their computer and photography skills. It’s impressive to see how enthusiastic women taking part in the program are about their weblogs and how a simple ICT technology, such as weblogs, may help improving the life of people.

See the Nari Jibon project website and the Global/Rising Voices website for more information.

(The image is from http://rising.globalvoicesonline.org, originally posted on Flickr by Kiraka. Thanks to Martin for pointing me to this project.)





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How Weblogs help Women in Bangladesh to create new Skills
was published on 09.09.2008 by Martin Tomitsch. It files under global
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